Phrase never uttered in FL:Cute as a bug

Cute as a Bug!?

Myammy! Moving in together at 50...

black and white insect on green leaf

The perpetually Sunshine State may be all about miles of white sandy beaches, warm aquamarine waters, and stately palm trees but, it also is the

Bug Capital of the Region.

“La Cucaracha” was a song we sang in 8th grade Spanish class. Here, they are your roommates.

Our backyard is a vast tropical expanse.  There are a dozen palm trees of varying sizes and a massive Star Fruit tree that drops bitter yellow blobs at an alarming rate.

Forget about sitting quietly and meditating while gazing upon this lush, green paradise.  Everywhere you look, slithering on every tree, table, chair fencepost -are lizards, geckos and chameleons and the occasional black snake.   They say the snakes are benign and supposedly good luck,  however, that rising up like a Cobra-thing they do before they dart and gobble up lizards is gross.

Early on, the perpetual optimist, I thought I…

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The problem with Twitter- my short love affair

Myammy! Moving in together at 50...

photo_5939_20080515

When I was eight, I published my first newspaper. I sold every copy!

My parents bought all three copies.

I carefully printed pithy stories about my older brothers, our dog and my mean Second grade teacher.

I used a Ticonderoga pencil #2 and a Big Chief Tablet.

I have been writing – often and passionately – ever since.

A star was born

I am famous for grocery lists, newsletters, Letters to the Editor and for my Dating at 50  bit for The New York Times “Modern Love.”

I know my limits

I’ve never met a writing challenge I couldn’t resist: Sonnet of the week, Haiku of the Day, Limericks for St Patrick’s Day, The Month Python Christmas Carols redux…

WordPress serves a challenge over the net  several times day – and I am there. I am all over it.

My love affair with Twitter started a year ago.

A friend suggested…

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No hugs, please

mayhem-tile-gps

All in the Family?!?

Please don’t hug me…

Lightly Lifted from Article written by esteemed Epidemologist

Although social distancing measures have been (at least temporarily) well-received, there is an obvious-but-overlooked phenomenon when considering groups (i.e. families) in transmission dynamics. 

While social distancing decreases contact with members of society, it typically increases your contacts with Family Members AND very close friends. 

This small and obvious fact has surprisingly Profound Implications on Disease Transmission dynamics. 

Study after study demonstrates that even if there is only a

 little bit of connection between groups 

(i.e. social dinners, playdates/playgrounds, etc.), 

the epidemic isn’t much different than 

if there was no measure in place. 

The same underlying fundamentals of disease transmission apply, 

AND the result is that the community is left with all of the social and economic disruption but very little public health benefit.

You should perceive your entire family to function as a single individual unit; 

if one person puts themselves at risk, everyone in the unit is at risk.

Seemingly small social chains get large and complex with alarming geometric speed

Is 45 loved world wide? Not so much

Myammy! Moving in together at 50...

A man should have duties outside of himself;

without them, he is a mere balloon,

inflated with thin egotism and drifting nowhere.

Thomas Bailey Aldrich

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BEWARE:Birthday parties / funerals death

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Birthday parties / funerals: Just to see how simple infection-chains can be, this is a real story from Chicago.

The name is fake. Bob was infected but didn’t know. Bob shared a takeout meal, served from common serving dishes, with 2 family members. The dinner lasted 3 hours.

The next day, Bob attended a funeral, hugging family members and others in attendance to express condolences.

Within 4 days, both family members who shared the meal are sick.

A third family member, who hugged Bob at the funeral became sick.

But Bob wasn’t done. Bob attended a birthday party with 9 other people. They hugged and shared food at the 3 hour party. Seven of those people became ill.

Over the next few days Bob became sick, he was hospitalized, ventilated, and died.

But Bob’s legacy lived on. Three of the people Bob infected at the birthday went to church, where they sang, passed the tithing dish etc. Members of that church became sick.

In all, Bob was directly responsible for infecting 16 people between the ages of 5 and 86.      Three of those 16 died.

The spread of the virus within the household and back out into the community through funerals, birthdays, and church gatherings is believed to be responsible for the broader transmission of COVID-19 in Chicago. (ref)

 

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This was lifted from a piece by Erin Bromage

Somber, Sober Sane: read this

Please Read this by Yale Epidemiologist, Jonathan Smith:

As an infectious disease epidemiologist, at this point I feel morally obligated to provide some information on what we are seeing from a transmission dynamic perspective and how they apply to the social distancing measures. Like any good scientist I have noticed two things that are either not being articulated or not present in the “literature” of social media. I have also relied on my much smarter infectious disease epidemiologist friends for peer review of this post; any edits are from that peer review.

Specifically, I want to make two aspects of these measures very clear and unambiguous.

First, we are in the beginning of this epidemic’s trajectory. That means even with these distancing measures we will see cases and deaths continue to rise globally, nationally, and in our own communities in the coming weeks. This may lead some people to think that the social distancing measures are not working. They are. They may feel futile. They aren’t. You will feel discouraged. You should. This is normal in chaos. But this is normal epidemic trajectory. Stay calm. This enemy that we are facing is very good at what it does; we are not failing. We need everyone to hold the line as the epidemic inevitably gets worse.

This is not my opinion; this is the unforgiving math of epidemics for which I and my colleagues have dedicated our lives to understanding with great nuance, and this disease is no exception. 

I want to help the community brace for this impact. Stay strong and with solidarity knowing with absolute certainty that what you are doing is saving lives, even as people begin getting sick and dying. You may feel like giving in. Don’t.

 

All in the Family?!?

Please don’t hug me…

Although social distancing measures have been (at least temporarily) well-received, there is an obvious-but-overlooked phenomenon when considering groups (i.e. families) in transmission dynamics. 

While social distancing decreases contact with members of society, it typically increases your contacts with Family Members AND very close friends. 

This small and obvious fact has surprisingly Profound Implications on Disease Transmission dynamics. 

Study after study demonstrates that even if there is only a little bit of connection between groups 

(i.e. social dinners, playdates/playgrounds, etc.), 

the epidemic isn’t much different than 

if there was no measure in place. 

The same underlying fundamentals of disease transmission apply, 

AND the result is that the community is left with all of the social and economic disruption but very little public health benefit.

You should perceive your entire family to function as a single individual unit; 

if one person puts themselves at risk, everyone in the unit is at risk.

 

Seemingly small social chains get large and complex with alarming geometric speed:

If your son visits his girlfriend, and you later sneak over for coffee with a neighbor, your neighbor is now connected to the infected office worker that your son’s girlfriend’s mother shook hands with.    This sounds silly, it’s not. This is not a joke or a hypothetical. We as epidemiologists see it borne out in the data time and time again and no one listens. Conversely, any break in that chain breaks disease transmission along that whole chain.

In contrast to hand-washing and other personal measures, social distancing measures are not about individuals, they are about societies working in unison. These measures also take a long time to see the results. It is hard (even for me) to conceptualize how on a population level, ‘one quick little get together’ can undermine the entire framework of a public health intervention, but it does. I promise you it does.            I promise. I promise. I promise.

You can’t cheat it. People are already itching to cheat on the social distancing precautions just a “little”- a playdate, a haircut, or picking up a needless item at the store, etc. From a transmission dynamics standpoint, this very quickly recreates a highly connected social network that undermines all of the work the community has done so far.

Until we get a viable vaccine this unprecedented outbreak Will Not be Overcome in one grand, sweeping gesture, rather only by the collection of individual choices our community makes in the coming months. This virus is unforgiving to choices outside the rules.

My goal in writing this is to prevent communities from getting ‘sucker-punched’ by what the epidemiological community knows will happen in the coming weeks.

It will be easy to be drawn to the idea that what we are doing isn’t working and become paralyzed by fear, or to just‘cheat’ a little bit in the coming weeks.

By knowing what to expect, and knowing the importance of maintaining these measures, my hope is to encourage continued community spirit, strategizing, and action to persevere in this time of uncertainty.

Jonathan is a lecturer in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases and Global Health at Yale University School of Public Health.

 

Shelter in place and Wash your Hands

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick.

Learn when and how you should wash your hands to stay healthy.

~~~~~Wash Your Hands Often to Stay Healthy~~~~

Tell a Friend…nicely.man-couple-people-woman

 

You can help yourself and your loved ones stay healthy by washing your hands often, especially during these key times when you are likely to get and spread germs:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food

  • Before eating food

  • Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea

  • Before and after treating a cut or wound

  • After using the toilet

  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet

  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste

  • After handling pet food or pet treats

  • After touching garbage

PLEASE      Keep SIX FEET AWAY